The Gambling Sports Writer

The Gambling Sports writer2 Grade Level assignment used: 12 Course: MDM 4UO (Data Management) Curriculum (Ontario) Expectations Addressed: 1) solve problems involving the probability of an event or a combination of events for discrete sample spaces; 2) solve problems involving the application of permutations and combinations to determine the probability of an event. The “Gambling Sports Writer” is a  task, that students work in pairs to complete. They read a story about Bill Frey a sports writer with a sever gambling addiction. On a particularly bad night of gambling Bill loses half a million dollars! A half million he does…

Activity for linear Relations: Does the Cat catch the mouse?

Does the cat catch the mouse Grade level of activity: Grade 9 Course used for: MPM 1D (Academic) Ontario Curriculum expectations addressed: construct tables of values, graphs, and equations, using a variety of tools (e.g., graphing calculators, spreadsheets, graphing software,paper and pencil),to represent linear relations derived from descriptions of realistic situations (Sample problem: Construct a table of values, a graph, and an equation to represent a monthly cellphone plan that costs $25,plus $0.10 per minute of airtime.); describe a situation that would explain the events illustrated by a given graph of a relationship between two variables determine other representations of…

Using high school math to work out the annual interest rate of Kobe Bryant’s brilliant investment

Kobe Bryant became a NBA legend with his smooth moves on the basketball court, it appears that he has some smooth moves off the court as well.  According to espn Kobe Bryant’s 6 million investment grew to become 2oo million in about four and a half years. http://www.espn.com/nba/story/_/id/24384862/kobe-bryant-6m-investment-sports-drink-now-worth-200m   An application of the mathematics taught in the 11th grade is to work out the annual interest rate of Bryant’s investment using the compound interest formula. The following article discusses what investors should consider a “good rate of return”, and suggests that 15% to 20% is high and too much to…

Can you solve the most famous math problem in English Literature? How many were going to St Ives?

The following trick question appeared in the early 19th century in a Mother Goose nursery rhyme: As I was going to St Ives, I met a man with seven wives, Every wife had seven sacks, Every sack had seven cats, Every cat had seven kits, Kits, cats, sacks, wives, How many were going to St. Ives? Answer: 2, 800 do you know how we get this answer?